Edits

August 19, 2013
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Yes!  Edits are completely done.  Every author should have heard from us and received edits and we should have them all back.

Trust & Treachery Author Beth Cato’s Latest News

May 31, 2013
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Congratulations to Beth Cato on her latest publications. Stolen from her website:

Her story “Clementine, Who Swims with Mermaids” is featured in the Oceans issue of Penumbra, and over this year she’ll have more fiction in Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Oomph, Blue Shift Magazine, and Big Pulp, and poems in Tales of the Talisman, Abyss & Apex, Star*Line and Space and Time Magazine.

Her poetry is in  “The Truth About Fairies” in Star*Line 36.2, an autobiographical poem “autism” at Every Day Poets, a steampunk poem “Mice” in issue 28 of Mythic Delirium, and “Cloud Shapers” in Illumen.

Pretty awesome, yes? Congrats Beth Cato!  We’re proud to have you on board!

Quick Update

May 29, 2013
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Just returned from Balticon and had some discussions with a great small publishing company.  No promises yet, but will keep you posted!

Trust & Treachery Author John Floyd’s Latest Release – Deception

May 10, 2013
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Deception Book CoverTrust and Treachery author John Floyd’s latest release is Deception It looks to be very popular as I know personally that Amazon was out of stock and has had to re-order at least once.

From his publisher, Dogwood Press: Deception isn’t only the name of this book, or the title of one of the tales inside. It might be said that deception is also the central theme of the hundreds of short stories John M. Floyd has written and published over the past nineteen years. Many are mysteries and some represent other genres–fantasy, Western, romance, etc.–but all of them involve trickery and Hitchcockian plot reversals.

The second story in Deception, “Turnabout,” was included among Other Distinguished Mystery Stories of 2011 in The Best Mystery Stories of 2012 (Mariner Books, 2012).

You can get a behind-the-scenes view of the writing of Deception from John’s “Next Big Thing” blog post at SleuthSayers, and if you want to get a taste of John’s writing you can read “The Outside World” in the March/April issue of the Saturday Evening Post.

Congrats John Floyd!  We’re proud to have you on board!

Presenting Trust & Treachery Author James Daniel Ross

March 14, 2013
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One of the things we want to do here at Trust & Treachery is give you a chance to get to meet our authors. Over the next few weeks, you will see bios and Q&As for our amazing contributors. Today is author James Daniel Ross.  I’m a little late for our regular Monday posting but I intend to get right back up on that horse for our last few authors.  Stay tuned.

Best,

Day Al-Mohamed

 

James Daniel RossAuthor Q&ALast Dragoon Cover - James Daniel Ross

 

Do you have any recent events to announce (of publications or anything else exciting)?

I have just released a new Fantasy Novel: The Last Dragoon. It is beginning to gather some attention as did the last fantasy novel: The Story of Fox Crow

What inspired you to write this story?

Two women I truly admire and adore, even from afar. One of them is portrayed as she is and as she wishes to be – even though she is much better as she really is, and the other the way she really is, even though I think she would be happier with 10% less intrigue.

What books and/or authors have most influenced you?

Joel Rosenberg – fantasy and science fiction author, Tom Clancy, Mark Twain, Shakespeare, Terry Pratchett, to name a few.

What are you reading now?

Government forms. Between working one job and another most of my entertainment time has gone *poof*! Normally I will save a day, once or twice a year, and plow through it in one go.

What are your current projects?

I am working day and night on a fantasy novel called Salient Dreams with Neal Levin. It involves a young lady who is drawn into the corruption and lies under the surface of the city she lives in. After that will be Fox Crow 2.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Keep going. No, go farther. Know more. Even more. Study everything, then never stop writing, not for a second. Do not stop! Are you writing? Why aren’t you writing now? There are a million stories inside of you, start letting them out, now! Go! Ok, finish the interview, then go!

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Dear God, thank you all. Every day I am humbled to know you wanted to spend time with the stick figures in my head. While that might sound trite, there is no higher honor I aspire to. Please, stick with me. I got more to tell, more to show you.

What is your favorite quote, by whom, and why?

OUCH! As hard as picking my favorite child. So many good ones from Twain and Menkin, how about this one:

“Government is not reason, it is not eloquence – it is force. Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and fearful master.”  ― George Washington

What are you most proud of accomplishing so far in your life?

Every day I shake off the pointed fingers, the sneering chuckles, the degrading laughter of people who knew as much of me as I know of the universe. Every day I get up and sluice the corpses of these biting insects off. Some days I am better than others. Yet, I have grown, become a novelist, own my own home, fathered three children, and have stood for what I believe even when the world told me to sit down and take what it had to give me. I am not silent, I am not cowardly, I am merciful, and I am kind. I find in a group, this pimply faced kd shqaped like an apple is looked to as a wise man, and even a leader. I am becoming who I always wanted to be, and I am amazed how often that never happens for most people.

What inspires you to write and why?

Oooh, dear! I am a writer, a poet, a novelist. I don’t do it ‘because’. It is written in my bones. Were I a caveman I would make up stories for why the scorpion chases the hunter. Were I dead, I would sit in the corner, reading and writing stories to the children who have yet to move on. I am alive, so I write. It is who I am.

What has been the toughest criticism given to you as an author? What has been the best compliment?

The harshest criticism was from a game publisher who basically (and very, very, publically) told me I was a better pizza delivery guy than I would ever be an author. Since I am still writing, and his RPG company folded in on him like an English muffin made of dog excrement, I think it is time to be an adult and finally say:

“YO! James Wallace! You limey lickspittle! I hope you die in a fire you lukewarm, wildly untalented, sod-sodden pantywaist! You may have crapped over the dreams of others, but it still will never stop them being better than you! I’ve published more novels than you have games, you hack!”

AHEM. Yes, I think that will do it.

And, I guess the best compliment I have ever gotten involves a bit of hero worship. I was giving an interview and talked about how I was inspired to work by Mr. Rosenberg, and how I always wanted to thank him for writing. He helped me believe in something during one of the darkest periods of my life.

” But most importantly, when I didn’t have any friends, it made me feel like maybe I did.” -Phillip J Fry.

Anyway, he found the interview and posted: “sometimes making an old man cry is a hell of a nice thing to do.”

The complete opposite of Jim Wallace, he had heard my nerdity gushing, and was very nice about the whole thing. He passed on a few months later, so I never got to know him or take him up on his offer for lunch, but I take solace in the fact that he knew how much he meant to me, and how much he helped a nerdy kid escape highschool intact.

Tell us something unusual (or fun) about you.

I fall in love far too easily.
James Daniel Ross can be found online at http://www.radiationangels.com and is also on Twitter and Facebook.
I Know Not Cover - JDR

Presenting Trust & Treachery Poet – Ray Succre

March 4, 2013
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One of the things we want to do here at Trust & Treachery is give you a chance to get to meet our authors. Over the next few weeks, you will see bios and Q&As for our amazing contributors. Today is poet Ray Succre.  Stay tuned as additional authors are added every Monday.

Best,

Editors, Trust & Treachery

 

Ray SuccreAuthor Ray Succre

Ray Succre is 35 and currently lives in Coos Bay, Oregon, a small, coastal town where art is sparse and, when it does exist, is of a general relation to driftwood, deer, dying romance, or various maritime subjects. He has tried to leave the town numerous times. He is married, has a seven year-old son, and loves the south coast. He is a novelist and a writer of poetry, and has recently returned to college in order to become Mr. Succre, an eventual teacher of English and writing to the next generation.  He relocated with his family to Iowa City in June 2012.

As an author, Ray’s work can be found in hundreds of publications across two dozen countries. His work has been published in numerous journals, anthologies, and sites, and his early work also appeared (with excellent company) in The Book of Hopes and Dreams, a charity anthology edited by Dee Rimbaud, out of Scotland.  Ray has been nominated for the the Best of the Web Award, as well as the Pushcart Prize on several occasions, and he is also a winner of the Adroitly Placed Word Award, for spoken word.

Ray’s novels Tatterdemalion (Cauliay Publishing 2008), and Amphisbaena (Cauliay Publishing 2009) are widely available in print and were released to strong reviews. They are available through most bookstores and are easily found through any online outlets. A third novel, A Fine Young Day, is available, as are the others, through the Kindle store. His first complete book of poetry, Other Cruel Things (Differentia Press 2009), is available free online as an ebook.

Ray can be found online at http://raysuccre.blogspot.com and is also on Twitter and Facebook.

 

Author Q&A

Do you have any recent events to announce (of publications or anything else exciting)?

Having spent a few years in community college, I was recently accepted by the University of Iowa, and will begin in Fall 2012.  I’ll be relocating my family in June from Coos Bay to Iowa City.  On the press side of things, my third novel, A Fine Young Day (my take on a horror novel) was just released through the Kindle platform.

What inspired you to write this story?

It’s based on a true story that happened to me when I was four.  My father used to tell me about it laughing.  I was the kid that got bit on the head while explaining how an electronic toy truck worked to its owner.  In actual life, I didn’t bite the other kid back.  This poem is me wondering what would have happened if I had, and the point behind why the unexpectedness of a bite could get one praise or a laugh, while a retaliatory action would not.  A learning lesson.

What books and/or authors have most influenced you?

I’ve pulled a lot of mileage from Milton, Steinbeck, Spenser, and Whitman, but influence is tough to nail down.  For every line reminiscent of a particular author, there’ll be another that isn’t.  Trying to figure out why I like something is a big part of learning from it.

What are you reading now?

I just finished a large Edith Hamilton myth collection (a comfort setup from when I was a kid), several collections of work by various poets, and, due to school, a ton of plays throughout history.  My favorite of the term was Oedipus Rex, though Tennessee Williams is pretty amazing.  I had a Shakespeare sequence, too, adding the tetralogy and a few comedies to my Shakespeare readings.  I very much enjoyed the class.

What are your current projects?

Releasing A Fine Young Day online, and formatting Other Cruel Things, a book of poetry that came out in ’09 through Differentia Press, to release it on the Kindle.  I’ve been revising Thank You and Good Night and Miel, two other novels, much lately, and hope to release one of them Summer.   Quitting smoking.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Revise the older works and write the new works better.  This process never actually ends until you do.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you.  For all of it.  You’re why I’m here.  Tell your friends why you read and who.  Convince them.

What is your favorite quote, by whom, and why?

Lately:  “We need to make books cool again. If you go home with somebody and they don’t have books, don’t fuck them.”  -John Waters

What are you most proud of accomplishing so far in your life?

I know it’s a mulchy answer, but honestly, being a dad is the best thing ever.  I am most proud of my kid, who I see, at this point (having been a stay home dad for awhile), as one of the accomplishments my wife and I can both claim, and it’s the one for which I have the most pride.  Sure, I’m proud of a few things I’ve written, and some strange feats that happened over the years, but all of that easily fits in the shadow of how I feel about being a dad.  Okay, come and get me, Sentimenal Police.

What inspires you to write and why?

Everything, but most acutely, reading.  If I read a line somewhere and enjoy it, the urge to write comes on instantly and I have to get myself to a page.  It’s a bit of a compulsion, but a rewarding one, and there has never been a point where I didn’t enjoy it immensely.

What has been the toughest criticism given to you as an author? What has been the best compliment?

The toughest criticism (this came from a publisher, regarding a novel):  “This is not marketable.  No one will like this.”  Best compliment (from a reviewer, regarding the same novel):  “Succre is one of my favorite living writers.”

Tell us something unusual (or fun) about you.

Unusual wears many disguises.  I’ll say this:  I can discern the level of remaining power in watch batteries, AA, AAA, and C batteries, by tasting them.  I am freakishly accurate with this weird ability and have held my own against battery testing machines a couple of times now.  While I’m sure there are others who can do this, I have yet to meet one.  I treat it as a party trick.